Category Archives: Universality

From the Moon, together, we can see it…

The Universality of World Religion

The Universality of One World

Grosse Pointe Unitarian Church. Sunday, April 28, 2019. Grosse Pointe, Michigan

I’ll first outline in brief the experiment of the Charles Street Meeting House in Boston, from 1949 to about 1960, and sketch a little how it looks now given the life of our country and culture during the intervening fifty-five years, and then suggest the value the experiment might still hold for today. In 1964, Beacon Press and Meeting House Press published Kenneth L. Patton’s book A Religion for One World: Art and Symbols for a Universal Religion. Patton presents what he calls the history of the experiment of the Universalist Charles Street Meeting House, at the foot of Beacon Hill in Boston…

Frederick Glaysher

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The Search for Universal Spirituality. A Talk by Frederick Glaysher

Theosophical Society of Detroit – Friday, December 7, 2018. 7:00 – 9:00 pm. Q&A. 27745 Woodward Avenue, Berkley, MI 48072.

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Frederick Glaysher

Frederick Glaysher spoke about the long journey of modernity during the last 130 to 150 years in search of a universal conception of spirituality. Glaysher discusses the book The World’s Parliament of Religions, 1893, and key influential speakers and groups represented at The Parliament in Chicago, including Vivekananda, Brahmo Samaj, the Unitarian Church, and the Theosophical Society, highlighting and surveying Madame Blavatsky’s emphasis on Universal Brotherhood and the study of comparative religion. Further currents include Dara Shikoh, Rammohan Roy, Rabindranath Tagore, Abdul-Baha, Rumi, Kabir, poets and mystics, Emerson. Among other seeking souls touched on, Evelyn Underhill, Arnold Toynbee, Micea Eliade, Joseph Campbell, and Huston Smith.

Frederick Glaysher

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New Review of Into the Ruins: Poems

Into the Ruins: Poems

New Review of Into the Ruins: Poems

Somehow I missed this review online in August, 2016, just stumbling on it now. A pleasure to find… a thoughtful engagement.

 

“I will definitely be checking out more of his work in the future (Parliament of Poets looks good). This book deals with many of the horrors and terrors of the long 20th century, and in many ways chastises the poets of this period for not finding an effective way to confront that horror.”

“…this book is quite good. It is well laid out, and does what so few collection of poems do– that is build an argument or overall claim. There are short pieces that deal with the visceral horrors of conflict, relying on powerful imagery, and then longer drawn out philosophical pieces that culminate what Glaysher has been saying.”

“The result is a collection that makes shorter, powerful jabs, followed by a prolonged punch. The reader is therefore left with the power of the poetry as the poems build on each other in rapid succession. Well written, thought out, and containing a clear purpose, I highly recommend Into the Ruins and look forward to reading Glaysher’s other works.” —Wes Bishop, Goodreads

For a selection of poems from Into the Ruins, see the first half of my poetry reading at Hannan Cafe, November 3, 2015.

At the Birmingham Unitarian Church,  March 31, 2014, I read another poem from Into the Ruins, “The Crowned Maitreya,” the Buddha of the Future, Japan’s national treasure, housed in Kyoto at Koryu-ji Temple.

Into the Ruins: Poems at Amazon

Frederick Glaysher

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Review: Envisions a Unified World

The_Globe200Envisions a Unified World —Bob Dixon-Kolar, Assistant Professor of English, College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, Illinois
April 28, 2016

“To those coming to The Parliament of Poets without having read other things by Glaysher (such as his essays or other poems), let me point out that the author identifies at a deep soul-level with the world-renowned poets who inhabit his contemporary epic. His book is an intellectual achievement, yes. But it is much more than that—it is the artistic culmination of a long spiritual journey.

Glaysher’s alter-ego in the epic (Persona) encounters Ralph Waldo Emerson and implores him,

‘Tell me how to go on from here, how to raise
a universal song For All Mankind,
as universal as the morning wind.’

This, as I understand it, is Glaysher’s heart-felt desire. If you choose to read The Parliament of Poets—and I hope that you will!—know that you are reading a devotional work of a poet-seer, one who yearns for and envisions a unified world in which spiritual verities draw all people together.”

Frederick Glaysher

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